Wobbly Ditches and Splodgy Banks

The next season of excavation at Butts Brow starts on Monday 13th July until 2nd August. The excavation will be socially distanced but visitors are welcome to pop by and find out about the latest discoveries. We will be posting regular updates and live streaming from the site to our social media channels. We willContinue reading “Wobbly Ditches and Splodgy Banks”

Introducing Heritage Eastbourne’s Archaeology Collection

Kelly van Doorn In the past Heritage Eastbourne’s archaeology collection was underused, which is strange given the size of it! We have objects and archives from the St Anne’s Anglo-Saxon cemetery, Eastbourne Urban Medieval Excavation Project (EUMEP), Bullock Down, Beachy Head, Combe Hill, Summerdown, Motcombe… and the list goes on. Archaeology is a valuable resourceContinue reading “Introducing Heritage Eastbourne’s Archaeology Collection”

The story that begins with a nut

Kelly van Doorn A large part of my job as Collections Officer is reconciling objects with object identification numbers. Early documentation was not up to modern standards and descriptions of objects are sometimes lacking, staff of the 1980s, I’m looking at you! Reconciliation involves me going back through all of the accession registers, object entryContinue reading “The story that begins with a nut”

The Downs Ranger

Lizzie Williams Jumbo, Princess Pat, Mark and Tommy are all names that visitors to Eastbourne may have been familiar with over the years, especially if they visited Beachy Head. These were all names of horses that belonged to the Downs Ranger. The Downs Ranger was a position within Eastbourne Police, whose job it was toContinue reading “The Downs Ranger”

150 years of Eastbourne Pier

Katherine Buckland 13th June 2020, marks 150 years since the official opening of Eastbourne Pier. This blog post explores the beginning of Eastbourne Pier’s story and includes some great photos! The first rumblings of an idea for a Pier in Eastbourne started in 1863; it wasn’t popular at first due to a misunderstanding that itContinue reading “150 years of Eastbourne Pier”

Eastbourne Bicycle Club: Cyckhanas, Loose Knickerbockers and adventures around Normandy

Katherine Buckland As we are all encouraged to take to two wheels instead of four and to mark #BikeWeek 2020, this post explores the story of Eastbourne Bicycle Club. To do that properly, we should start with the man who founded it. Luther Adams was born in Worthing and moved with his family to EastbourneContinue reading “Eastbourne Bicycle Club: Cyckhanas, Loose Knickerbockers and adventures around Normandy”

Arthur Henry Crook

Eastbourne’s Key Workers Lizzie Williams Arthur Henry Crook was a doctor who lived in Eastbourne in the early to mid-1900s and worked at the Princess Alice Hospital for over 30 years. Arthur was born in 1884 in Southampton, and studied Natural Sciences at Christ College, Cambridge. He was awarded a scholarship to study medicine atContinue reading “Arthur Henry Crook”

Happy Volunteering A personal view

Paula, Heritage Eastbourne volunteer December 25th 2011 was a strange day for my family – not Christmas celebrations but sadness.  Our mum passed away unexpectedly that day.  She’d battled Dementia but could not recover from a broken hip as a result of a fall.   I’d left my much loved employment at a local veterinary practiceContinue reading “Happy Volunteering A personal view”

Stories from the Store – Artificial Leg made in Changi Prisoner of War Camp, 1944

Kelly van Doorn A small but fascinating part of the collection are the objects made by Prisoners of War. From French Napoleonic prisoners to South African Boers in Ceylon, each item tells a unique story of time and place. One which I would like to focus on is a rather unusual object… This item wasContinue reading “Stories from the Store – Artificial Leg made in Changi Prisoner of War Camp, 1944”

Tunnel Vision

Jo Seaman I have grown up with stories of secret tunnels.  Suburban myths of passages linking Victorian cellars on an old bomb site (known, rather enigmatically as The Spare Land)  in my childhood of the 1970’s and the ubiquitous smugglers’ lairs and underground escape routes of rural Kent and Sussex in my life since.  TheyContinue reading “Tunnel Vision”

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